South Bay Woman with a Museum and a Mission: To Teach the Holocaust
  • Education
  • Holocaust
  • JFCS in the News

J Weekly

By Rob Gloster

As a child, Iris Bendahan was confused when her grandmother would speak of relatives who were “not here because of Hitler.” It wasn’t until her sixth-grade class in Israel saw an exhibition on the Holocaust that she finally understood.

As an adult, the former religious school principal at Congregation Beth David in Saratoga has made it her mission to ensure Bay Area kids have no such confusion.

Bendahan, 57, personally created a Holocaust museum that has been on display each spring at Beth David since 2009. This year, it will be available for viewing until May 3. The museum is open during synagogue hours and there’s no admission charge.

The museum project helped make Bendahan one of the three winners this year of the Morris Weiss Award for Outstanding Holocaust Education, presented by the Holocaust Center at Jewish Family and Children’s Services. The award was established by the family of the late Morris Weiss, a survivor and the founder of the JFCS Holocaust Center.

Read the full story here >

 


Posted by Admin on April 25, 2017
Survivors bring history to life for students hungry for learning
  • Education
  • Holocaust
  • JFCS in the News
  • Youth

J Weekly

By Carly Nairn

While most high school students wouldn’t choose to spend their weekends inside a classroom, Piedmont High School senior Danny DeBare did. The Jewish teen, along with hundreds of his peers, gathered last Sunday at a San Francisco high school to bring Jewish history into focus.

Holocaust Survivor with Student

“Participation is everything to get the full effect of learning the history,” said DeBare.

Now in its 15th year, the Day of Learning, organized by the JFCS Holocaust Center, brought together Holocaust survivors in the Bay Area and 750 students and educators from schools in the region — from as far away as Modesto — to listen, engage and learn about the past and how its lessons apply to the future.

Read the full article here >


Posted by Admin on March 23, 2017
Grandchildren of Holocaust Survivors Unite!
  • Education
  • Holocaust
  • Volunteers
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A Legacy of Remembrance and Resilience To an observer, Zoe Goldfarb (center) and her peers look like any other group of young professionals when they get together—telling stories, sharing a meal, and catching up on each other’s lives. But this group, called 3gSF, has something very important in common. They call themselves “3Gs”—as in third generation—and they are all grandchildren of Holocaust survivors. Living Links between Holocaust Survivors and Future Generations “3G is the bridge generation,” says Morgan Blum Schneider, Director of Education at the JFCS Holocaust Center, noting that they are the ones with personal relationships with both… Read More

Posted by Admin on March 5, 2017
Holocaust program pairs survivors with Palo Alto teens
  • Education
  • Holocaust
  • JFCS in the News
  • Youth

The Mercury News

By Jacqueline Lee

It was her mother’s intuition that spared Denise Elbert from the gas chambers during the Jewish Holocaust in World War II.

Samantha Alvarez and Denise Elbert

Elbert was 9 months old in 1942 when she boarded a train headed for Sobibor with her mom and dad. Young Jewish Slovakian families, like the Elberts, had been told they were needed to help build a major German city, and locals lined the platform to see them off.

When Elbert’s mother spotted a good childhood friend, she decided to ask the friend to care for her daughter until the couple got settled in the new city.

None of the Jewish families knew then that Sobibor was a death camp.

“I think it was pure instinct,” Elbert said, “and that saved me.”

Elbert, 75, of Sunnyvale, knows her story is unique in that she is one of the younger survivors of the Holocaust.

Because of this, she willingly shares her story with young people through the Holocaust Center’s Next Chapter program, which pairs survivors with teens and regularly engages in a speaker series.

Read the full article at The Mercury News >


Posted by Admin on January 5, 2017
Sonoma County students learn about bigotry, hatred through a Holocaust lens
  • Education
  • Holocaust
  • JFCS in the News

The Press Democrat

By Christi Warren

Several generations have come and gone since May 1945 when the last prisoners were liberated from the Nazi concentration camps of World War II.

The Holocaust today feels far away, especially for youth increasingly separated from not only the harsh realities of a world at war, but the scope of Germany’s campaign of genocide.

For years, Jewish groups have worked to bring Holocaust survivors into classrooms to discuss their time in the camps, to tell their stories. But that population is quickly dwindling — fewer than 100,000 survivors remain — which is what sparked the effort to bring Bay Area students together for a program created by the Jewish Family and Children’s Services Holocaust Center in San Francisco called “the Big Read.”

Read the full article at The Press Democrat >


Posted by Admin on December 20, 2016
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